Slow Sewing a Quilted Jacket

Quilted Burda Jacket

I’m not sure where the idea for this jacket came from… but around the start of the school year, I found myself meditatively cutting, sewing and quilting scraps of fabric together. This jacket is made of the remains of many nostalgic prints, including leftovers from clothes fat quarters bought in Japan, There is a story behind every print, and I’m so glad that now I can wear and enjoy them!

Quilted Burda Jacket

I’m not one for quilting, in general, because of all the precision and planning… but oh, do I love an improv quilt! For this, I started by cutting a bunch of fabrics into randomly sized rectangles, and divided them into 4 piles (front, back, and 2 sleeves) so that the prints would be easily distributed. From there, I grabbed pieces and quilted them together into large squares (16×16″ ish) and joined the squares together until I had panels large enough to cut each section of the coat.

Quilted Burda Jacket
How gorgeous is that blue tencel denim on the inside when quilted? I might need a quilted tencel jacket now!

Next, I sandwiched bamboo/cotton batting from my stash between the panels and whatever woven yardage I could find, and quilted it in long vertical rows. I chose black thread because… well… nothing was going to match everything, so I thought black would disappear best! Although it’s quite visible on the paler fabrics, I think the overall effect from far away is quite harmonious. I didn’t use a ruler or set widths, so my quilting is very “organic”.

Quilted Burda Jacket

The pattern is used is Burda Plus and is intended for quilted fabric. The pieces looks absolutely boxy and huge when I printed them out, but it turned out true to size. (As in, I narrowed the centre back while sewing and then has to let out the sleeve seams to give my upper back some extra room!) It has all-important darts, fun raglan seamlines, and a curved seam along the top of the sleeve that gives a really nice fit.

If I was to complain about anything, it’s that I made the largest size Burda Plus has to offer. Which leaves room for improvement, I think!
Quilted Burda Jacket

I asked on Instagram if I should finish it with facings or binding… and everyone was right, black binding was the way to go! I like how it frames the mixed prints. I also added snaps for the first time ever – it was so easy and now I want to add them to everything!

Quilted Burda Jacket

I’ve never been much for slow sewing, but this jacket was the perfect project at a stressful time. Each step was easy, but it took many sessions to finish. It stopped me from overthinking the start of the school year, and that’s a serious feat!

I’d like to use the pattern again soon for a pink/black/rainbow eyelash tweed that I just picked up. I’m hoping to a psychedelic Chanel jacket look. Should I quilt that too? Let me know what you think!


22 thoughts on “Slow Sewing a Quilted Jacket

  1. It is just beautiful! Please tell me why the snaps went so well because I have hated working with them in the past. You must have found a great tool or brand? I’m so glad to hear that the project helped you transition a little easier to school. I hope you had a great start!

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    1. I bought the basic snaps at Len’s Mill, so they are nothing fancy… I think it must be that the quilted fabric is well suited to snaps! Not too think, not too thin? They do make a rattling sound as a walk, which is a little odd…

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  2. This is one of the best things you’ve ever made, IMO – and you make a ton of great things!! It fits beautifully. It coheres perfectly. It looks loved and meaningful and contextual. Honestly, you should make 5 of these. Def make one for your mum and Anne. Slow sewing is a bit like knitting (in a good way). And this is particularly like knitting socks and using up lots of yarn remnants and getting a great finished product that everyone thinks you’ve masterminded – but really you’re just being good to the world and getting organized!

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  3. Very unique and classic! It looks great with jeans, and could easily be ‘dressed up’ with a black maxi skirt/dress…or trousers…or LBD (Little Black Dress). So very ‘comforting’!

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  4. Love it! The black binding defines it. Yes, I think you need to quilt the next one in pink and black. The quilting will make them wear a bit like a sweater jacket. You will be very Chanel! I love texture as well as print, so quilting adds that depth.

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  5. Just saw your jacket on the Foldline & had to come over to read the blogpost & see the piccies & give a big thumbs up!! i really love what you did with the outer fabrics, the idea of a patchwork jacket has been percolating in my head a while now, brilliant to see what you did & you have added fuel to my imagination .I especially love the linings too.

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  6. This is so beautiful – I love how the black frames the colours without being dull, it really makes it pop – like a stained glass window!

    I did want to flag that you have used the word ‘crazy’ a lot – in this post and in your instagram posts about it. It’s a pretty ableist use of the word and feels really jarring to me each time I see it – definitely tonally out of step with your usual thoughtful word useage! I wanted to flag it because it’s something I hadn’t thought about myself until someone pointed it out a few years ago, but now I find I flinch a bit when I read it, especially as someone with mental health issues myself!

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    1. Edited! Thank you it. “Crazy quilting” Is the term I grew up with to define a specific type of quilting without a plan, but I have changed it to “Improv quilting”!

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  7. Good for you for being meditative at the beginning of the school year, let alone sewing a quilted jacket! It looks so bright and cozy.

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