The Scroop Mahina Cardigan!

Pop quiz: Do you know what “scroop” means? I sure didn’t, until Leimomi created Scroop Patterns! It means the rustle of silk taffeta – and isn’t that a delicious mental sound?

Scroop Cardigan

I’ve never actually sewn silk taffeta, but I was very happy to be a pattern tester for the latest Scroop pattern: the Mahina Cardigan! There have been a few tweaks to the pattern since testing, but nothing to change the overall look.

Scroop Cardigan

The highest praise I can give this pattern is that the drafting/fitting system reminds me of my beloved Cake Espresso Leggings! You pick a shoulder size by measuring your shoulder width, and choose the right sleeve size based on your bicep measurement. Combine that with your choice of small, medium, large or oval body, and about 4 different options for finishing the edge, and you get a very customized cardigan!

Scroop Cardigan

Here’s what I love about it:

  • Great stashbuster! It works with any fabric with 25-40% stretch, from ponte to wool to jersey or ponte. I used this midweight poly sweater knit that has been in my stash for 5+ years.
  • Inclusive sizing. Leimomi started making patterns after lots of experience teaching sewing classes, and she has designed for a range of figures right from the start.
  • I love clever design! I’ve remembered this design for YEARS since Leimomi did her original self-drafted version… who could forget this Jedi photoshoot? I’ve honestly thought on and off about hacking my own version ever since, but trust me, whatever I figured out would not have been this smart! There are some darts helping with the shaping (but not where I would ever have put them) and I love the fitting system.
Scroop Cardigan

That said, I’ve already given it away! I knew even as I sewed it that it would suit my sister better than me. I tend to not like circular hems on cardigans because they tend to accentuate my wide hips. Nothing against my hips – I like ’em just fine! It’s something about the visual proportions though. I also like sharp square styles more than gentle round shapes. Finally, I find the collar ever so slightly fussy on me – as you can see in the pictures above, it sits a bit funny if I don’t pull it into place carefully. I wish it sat more snugly at the neck and stayed in place. That’s very personal though – Kibbe would perhaps say that this is a Natural or Romantic style, so it will look lovely on people who suit those soft draped feminine lines!

Scroop Cardigan

So there we have it, The Scroop Mahina Cardigan! If this is your style, you are going to love the pattern! It can be everything from cosy to elegant depending on fabric, and is a lovely quick sew!


8 thoughts on “The Scroop Mahina Cardigan!

  1. I love circle designs but I agree, the neck can be challenging. There’s this knitted garment I’ve made a bunch of times – and will prob make many more times – because EVERYONE loves it (when I decide to gift it to them), it’s super “hard to make” looking and it’s so wearable. Seriously – I don’t know why I make myself sweaters. My effort-per-wear is through the roof and then I wear the crap out of the weird vest accessories. Here it is (if your curiosity is piqued): https://www.ravelry.com/projects/KristinM100/balboa-waistcoat-5. PS: I know this colour isn’t one you gravitate towards (and who can understand why some colours call to us), but it’s so pleasing with your skin tone and hair colour. It’s very soft and dewy on you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That’s a really cool silhouette! It looks like it would be the practical twist on all of my fantasies about swanning around the woods in a cape like an elf. And I actually hadn’t seen that Jedi photoshoot, so thanks for sharing because that makes my night!

    Like

  3. You could still apply the sleeves to a different shape that might suit you better – I’m thinking of doing the same for my sister on something more oblong, maybe to recreate a waterfall cardigan she lost a couple years ago…
    For the very same reason of wide hips, I went for the oval myself, rather than the larger circles.

    Like

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